Friday, May 25, 2018

Watercolor Sketches

Two watercolor sketches from a trek to Santa Fe area. First is of the Rio Grande Gorge on a rather windy sfternoon. Had to hold m onto my paper. The second is of the Long House in Bandelier National Park

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Transferring the drawing

I used Conte powder to transfer the image onto the stone. The conte powder was on the back of a tracing made from the original sketch.

A New Lithograph

The start of a new stone lithograph of mixing adobe at Ranchos de Taos.  Now to figure out color.

Tuesday, May 15, 2018

A watercolor from the Gorge Songs Series.
"Winter Vista"   17 x 28"

Saturday, April 21, 2018

Gorge Songs Slip Cases

A day making up slip cases for the Gorge Songs Folios.  The covers are hand printed serigraphs.

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Planning a Reduction Print

A value progression is multiple values and colors layered over one progressing from light to dark. Each successive layer definines a progressively darker area of the image.

A simple value progression is moving from light to dark in three values. A color progression is moving from a pale color to a deeper hue of the same color and a two color progression moves from one color to another, each with gradations in between.

The form and shapes can be developed using a simple three value progression. The block is carved away or reduced between each color run.














Color can be added by printing transparent glazes over the values runs.













This is an excerpt from the booklet "Reduction Woodblocks" with tips and guides on creating reduction woodblock prints.  Available from the DCArtPressBookstore.

Cutting The Blocks

The first step is to outline the areas that will remain with a stop-cut. The stop cut will stop a clearing cut and maintain crisp edges on the areas to print. Use either a straight edge blade or a V-gouge to define an edge of a raised printing area. Make an initial cut about 1/16” away from the edge and then come back in and carefully refine the edge as desired.

Once all the edges have been define with a stop-cut, the waste areas can be removed with a flat gouge or chisel. The stop-cuts will help prevent over-cuts when clearing away the waste areas.















This is an excerpt from the booklet "Reduction Woodblocks" with tips and guides on creating reduction woodblock prints.  Available from the DCArtPressBookstore.